The Wandering Jew (1933)

5
(1)

Conrad Veidt stars as Matathias, a Jewish man who, after spitting on Christ en route to his crucifixion, is doomed to walk the earth until the Second Coming. After two passages – one set during the Crusades, the other in Mediaeval Italy – Matathias is offered redemption during the Spanish Inquisition.

Director: Maurice Elvey.
Writers: E. Temple Thurston (play), H. Fowler Mear.
Stars: Conrad Veidt, Marie Ney, Basil Gill, Cicely Oates, Anne Grey, Dennis Hoey, Bertram Wallis, Hector Abbas, Kenji Takase, Jack Livesey, Joan Maude, John Stuart, Arnold Lucy, Peggy Ashcroft, Francis L. Sullivan, Abraham Sofaer, Felix Aylmer, Ivor Barnard.

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2 Comments

  1. Gingerguardian
    December 21, 2021
    Reply

    That synopsis isn’t accurate; it seems to be for some entirely different film. Here’s the BFI’s description of this one:

    Conrad Veidt stars as Matathias, a Jewish man who, after spitting on Christ en route to his crucifixion, is doomed to walk the earth until the Second Coming. After two passages – one set during the Crusades, the other in Mediaeval Italy – Matathias is offered redemption during the Spanish Inquisition. The opening and closing segments are particularly haunting, and Veidt is excellent as the antihero. This was the second film based on E. Temple Thurston’s play, which had previously been adapted for a silent version in 1923, also directed by Maurice Elvey.

    The representation of Christ is imaginatively depicted; the viewer never sees him, and his words are conveyed silently, through words that appear eerily on screen. The last chapter features the screen debut of Peggy Ashcroft. Despite Matathias’ heroism in the final scenes, the portrayal of the Jew as arrogant and adulterous in the Jerusalem chapter led to the film being heavily cut before its US release.

    • Jon W.
      December 21, 2021
      Reply

      Thanks for pointing it out! I just changed it for the one from BFI, can’t put the whole thing as it’s too long so I put until “Spanish Inquisition”, I think it’s good enough. Looks like the previous synopsis was from the American version with the same title also from 1933 directed by George Roland.

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